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PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 11:38 pm 
Many questions have been raised concerning the Indian Point 2 and Indian Point 3 Power
Plants as to whether they are safe. The Tsunami crisis in Japan awakened America to the
dangers of nuclear plants, especially when the Commissioners of Nuclear Plants have not
answered my request for a review of the plants as to whether they can withstand a earth-
quake of 9.0. I am certain that they can only withstand a 7.0 earthquake and that is why
I never received a response.

An evacuation of 50 miles around Indian Point- the recent U.S. recommendation for American citizens would mean moving out more than 17 million people, including almost all of New York City.

The Governor, who lives 12 miles from Indian Point, has said he considers the plant, "an unnecessary risk,"

"I'm not against nuclear power, but I am against nuclear power in this plant in this location
with this density in Westchester County, with its proximity to New York City," he said.

Much of the concern about the effects of a sudden Indian Point shutdown comes from New York City.

A new study commissioned by the city's Depatment of Environmental Conversation con-
cluded in a preliminary draft that New Yorkers would pay more, the grid would become less reliable and air pollution would increase because most replacement power would come from fossil fuels.

That draft, leaked last week, estimated energy costs would rise up to 10 %, not including any subsidieis to new energy providers, upgrades to the grid of the costs of 1,100 jobs lost
at Indian Point.

Leaders from several state agencies responded with a statement saying the figures in the study could also support the conclusion that closing Indian Point "is commercially
feasible, does not compromise reliability and has little impact on cost." They said consumers would pay 5% more at most.

ARTICLE NOT IN FULL TEXT - see Newsday for Full Article

Safety of the People should be the number One concern. A rise of 5% in rates is a small
price to pay for saving lives. I agree with Gov. Cuomo that the Indian Point Plant should
not be relicensed. It is old and has had many defects unreported. LIPA owns 18% of
this Power Plant.

With so much new enery technology, if an Exploritory Committe were formed today the megawatts in energey lost from the nuclear plant could be replaced by other sources of
power. Such as; Hydropower from Niagara Falls, Champlain/Hudson Underground Power,
Cable, and a combination of other new technology and no fossil fuel may have to be used.

I would be happy to assist and look into what other sources are currently available and inform the Department of Envinronment or the New York Senatorial Energy and Telecommunication Chairman, Sen Maziarz and Co-Chairman, Sen. Fuchillo and Sen. LaValle.

With the addition of a new energy/power source, there would be employment of all those
that were unemployed. There were would not be any significant changes in that category.

We cannot displace the residents of New York City, it is an impossibility. We need to
find an alternative to the Indian Point nuclear power plant.

The Indian Point Power plant is located in Buchanan, New York, 35 miles up on the
Hudson River from midtown Manhattan, provides about a quarter of the power used in
New York City and Westchester Couty. The plant began operating in the 1970's and
licenses for the two reactors are set to expire in 2013 and 2015.

One other very good reason to close down the Indian Point Power Plant is that it has
contaminated the Hudson River with radioactive waste from the nuclear waste water it
needs to cool off the reactors.

Gov. Cuomo has declared his resolve to block relicensing; his aides recently met with
the plant's owner, Entergy Nuclear.

Owners of Nuclear plants do not share information of problems they have with the
nuclear plants. Therefore, they do not learn from each other on how to fix problems
with certain parts, which all of them could be learning from. They keep everything confi-
dential. This system should be changed if we want the Nuclear Plants in America
to become safer.

Sincerely,

Rose Van Guilder
President
Alliance for Independent Long Island
P. O. Box 108
W. Sayville, N. lY. 11796
631-319-6090


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 11:39 pm 
Angela,

Half of Great Brittan is not going to fall into the Atlantic ocean. You need that for a Tsunami to reach Indian Point. The Governor's experts know no Tsunami, 6.0 earthquake or a cat 3 hurricane can endanger any NYS Nuclear Power. However, people capable of the 9/11 Twin Tower disaster can. This is the energy industry looking to build coal and gas plants. Dinosaur fuel plants like Northport and Pt Jeff kill people every day. Nuclear plants are safer. We don't need actions that will lead to higher rates and less power to a struggling Long Island

The real danger we face is the chance that the LIPA Board will sell our assets within 100 days. I have reopened www.lipalies.com and rented the Marriot at Melville for 8/17 (7-9PM) (500 seats) and invited 2 Democrat & 2 Republican Assembly persons, 2 Suffolk County Legislators, One X chairman, Irving Like and Carmine to educate my friends. I am also meeting with 150 to 200 Tea Party members on the 26th with the hope of building an army to pressure the LIPA Board. We all need to ask the Governor to follow in his father's footsteps and call for a locally elected board of paid officials so we can fire them if they don't listen to us.

To jumpstart the BB with your permission I going to post several of her emails
Fred Gorman
800-833-2250


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 11:40 pm 
Fred,

Thanks for your thoughts on this. My approach to energy issues (and the way human beings live that creates the need for so much energy) is quite different than yours. But, just to address what you advocated:

As far as the safety of nuke power goes and supposing that an Earthquake or Tsunami does not occur at Indian Point in our lifetimes: you might want to read Normal Accidents, by Yale Professor Charles Perrow and his grad students, to get a description of what is involved in the construction and operation of such plants, and why safety problems are inevitable. The book contains abstracts of the transcript from the law suit brought by the operator, Detroit Edison, against the manufacturer, Babcock Wilcox, and their appraisals of the competence of each other – a great read. Over and above these considerations of how safely humans can work on complex systems is the question of the handling of the radioactive materials before, during, and after a plant’s life. Do you propose holding spent fuel rods in your backyard? If this technology made sense, the insurance companies would have been happy to make a profit from it - and the industry would not have needed Price Anderson, and now, its extension.

What assets does LIPA have to divest itself from in the next 100 days? I’m sure that you are not referring to National Grid’s generating capacity or its accounting and bill collecting capabilities or any of the other conflict-of-interest chores that LIPA assigned to it? Do you mean the piece of the upstate Nine Mile Island II nuclear plant that LIPA holds the title to. That plant does L I subscribers and taxpayers no good and may require us to pay for another decommissioning. I guess you mean the wire, switches, transformers, and control panels that connect National Grid’s generators to people’s homes and businesses. Gee, my neighbor down the block lost her home about six months ago when one of LIPA’s transformers in her backyard shorted its insulated windings and sent the high tension voltage (18kV?) throughout the wiring in her house. How many law suits would a buyer of old transformers like hers (and mine) have to have to realize it is not such a good deal?

Thanks for considering.

Bob Goldberg


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:25 am 
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Anonymous wrote:
Fred,

Thanks for your thoughts on this. My approach to energy issues (and the way human beings live that creates the need for so much energy) is quite different than yours. But, just to address what you advocated:

As far as the safety of nuke power goes and supposing that an Earthquake or Tsunami does not occur at Indian Point in our lifetimes: you might want to read Normal Accidents, by Yale Professor Charles Perrow and his grad students, to get a description of what is involved in the construction and operation of such plants, and why safety problems are inevitable. The book contains abstracts of the transcript from the law suit brought by the operator, Detroit Edison, against the manufacturer, Babcock Wilcox, and their appraisals of the competence of each other – a great read. Over and above these considerations of how safely humans can work on complex systems is the question of the handling of the radioactive materials before, during, and after a plant’s life. Do you propose holding spent fuel rods in your backyard? If this technology made sense, the insurance companies would have been happy to make a profit from it - and the industry would not have needed Price Anderson, and now, its extension.

What assets does LIPA have to divest itself from in the next 100 days? I’m sure that you are not referring to National Grid’s generating capacity or its accounting and bill collecting capabilities or any of the other conflict-of-interest chores that LIPA assigned to it? Do you mean the piece of the upstate Nine Mile Island II nuclear plant that LIPA holds the title to. That plant does L I subscribers and taxpayers no good and may require us to pay for another decommissioning. I guess you mean the wire, switches, transformers, and control panels that connect National Grid’s generators to people’s homes and businesses. Gee, my neighbor down the block lost her home about six months ago when one of LIPA’s transformers in her backyard shorted its insulated windings and sent the high tension voltage (18kV?) throughout the wiring in her house. How many law suits would a buyer of old transformers like hers (and mine) have to have to realize it is not such a good deal?

Thanks for considering.

Bob Goldberg



LIPA chairman's bombshell: Let's privatize
Originally published: April 28, 2011 10:46 PM
Updated: April 28, 2011 10:58 PM
By MARK HARRINGTON mark.harrington@newsday.com
Amid calls for greater scrutiny of the Long Island Power Authority, LIPA chairman Howard Steinberg Thursday dropped a bombshell: Privatize the public utility.
"If I could wave a wand today, I would say, 'Restore LIPA to private hands and PSC [Public Service Commission] regulation,' " Steinberg said in an interview, elaborating on his remarks during a trustees meeting.
LIPA, a state authority, is undergoing a strategic review of its long-term structure, one that examines selling the assets to a private company or taking on National Grid's thousands of LIPA workers and other assets and running the system itself. (London-based National Grid runs LIPA's electricity transmission and distribution systems under a $2.3-billion contract that expires in 2013.) LIPA came into being in 1998 as a result of public outrage over high utility rates under the Long Island Lighting Co., a private utility.
A third option, continuing as is, won't work, Steinberg said. "My personal opinion is that LIPA has matured and that this structure is no longer the best structure for the system."
Some board members disagreed with Steinberg, while one observer went so far as to call for his resignation.
Comments 'shocking'
Suffolk Legis. Wayne Horsley (D-Babylon), chairman of an energy committee for the legislature, termed Steinberg's comments as "shocking."
"Here is a chairman of the trustees abdicating any responsibility for LIPA's shortcomings," he said, calling the comments desperate. "Maybe it's time for him to leave the board."

Steinberg did not come out of left field. He tested the waters. No chairman suggests the sale of his own company or authority with out reason. The powers to be want LIPA to go away. The Underwriters love the Idea and the ratepayers will get another $9 Billion hosing.

As respect Nuclear accidents lets compare them to the sickness and death state of people living near the Dinosaur plants.



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